Healing, Shamanism, trauma, Travel

Ancestral Legacies

 

 

During cooking time in the communal kitchen at Bulungula Backpacker we made a friend, Mbali Marais, and Jasmine made fast friends with her impish companion, little Sepinkosi. We told her our story and she told us hers, and she offered to do a healing ceremony for us, at the place where the river flows out into the ocean. It was kind of a letting go of the wounds, letting go of the pain and grief after our baby boy, Rohan’s passing, and speaking to him, and speaking to all our ancestors. Mbali explains about the Ancestral Legacies, the primordial wound oscillating down the generations.

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Adventure, Entertainment, Music, Travel

We Believe

 

 

One Saturday while we were still at Bulungula, we saw this group of youngsters march in with ze Germans, Paul and Mauritz. I went to check what they were doing and I heard them spitting verses in the store room. Ahh Hip Hop. So I introduced myself and offered to produce a song and music video for them. They came to see me a little later, and I checked my laptop for a beat that they liked, and then they started writing and practising while I set up my mobile recording studio. We came up with a chorus together, based on what their rap was about, and then we recorded vocals in about an hour – they were quite well rehearsed. Then we went around the village recording video in a few locations. This took about an hour, and then I went back to our rondavel and worked through the night and by the next afternoon it was done. They all came back to Bulungula to see it, and they were blown away! They loved it! It was so much fun, and such a pleasure to bring so much joy to these young poets.

“I believe, you believe, we believe, in me!” by Killer Masterz and Double Dragons

Mo and Paul, are two German youngsters, who spent there gap-year volunteer teaching at the local primary school, in Elliotdale. They did so much more for these youngsters besides just teaching, they became friends and helped them with their music, they became part of the community and culture.

Art, Healing, Music, trauma, Travel

Music Therapy

 

The best thing about staying at a backpacker, especially one as remote and rustic as Bulungula, is the interesting, amazing, cool people you meet, getting to know them, and their stories, and having long meaningful chats about whatever. Vita and Francesco were on an adventure of their own around the entire south coast of Africa, part of it on bicycle. We really connected with them and took our meals together and talked endlessly, and just before they left I asked Vita to tell us abit more about what she does back home: What is Music Therapy and how can it help with healing Trauma?

 

 

Music was what kept me almost sane, growing up. I loved all kinds of music, but I would say that Rock, Raggae, and Trance always found a way to lift my spirits, and guide me. For the longest time music really was my religion. And then learning to play the guitar wasn’t easy for me, but I stuck with it, and eventually it became a way for me to express myself, to be creative and artistic which was what my soul yearns for, and to find away to transmute my wounds and the tight anxieties into beautiful words and sounds… the songs of my heart came pouring out.

We got Jasmine a little ukelele that fits her perfectly and I try to encourage her to play, but not push her but just let her take it at her own pace. She loves to sing and make up her own songs, no encouragement needed on that score (at times we have to ask her to calm down) but sometimes she comes up with these spontaneous truly inspired pieces, and towards the end of the video is one of those: “take a little time to heal” she says.